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Look After Baby Sloths Who Lost Their Moms At This Sloth Institution


Not many of us would leave their home and all the comforts of their birthplace, to move to a place where animals need them. However, when animals need us, it is our responsibility to help them.

Sam Trull was well aware of this when she decided to act to save baby sloths.

She left her home in the U.S. and went to Costa Rica, where she started an organization to help rehabilitate these adorable animals who have lost their mothers back into the wild.

It acts as an orphanage for baby sloths who are not capable of learning primary survival skills after this loss.

Trull founded the institute after she rescued a sloth named Kermie, that had lost its mother and home due to human encroachment.

Trull also published a book about sloths “Slothlove”.

She explains:

“I think one of my favorite things about sloths is that they mind their own business. I realize that the ‘circle of life’ requires all kinds of species of animals, including mischievous monkeys and carnivorous cats, and no offense to those animals that need to eat other animals to survive.

But how can I not be drawn to species that just want to eat their leaves, relax in the sunshine and the breeze and have a good scratch?! In addition, they have a very curious and playful side, something most people have never and will never see, but it is definitely the most endearing thing I have ever seen.”

These cuties made Trull decide to dedicate her life to saving them

She founded The Sloth Institute in Costa Rica

This is the baby sloth that inspired Sam to create the institute. It is called Kermie  

The special “soft” release technique of the organization helps the sloths to slowly get acclimated to the jungle, before being sent off on their own. The cage doors are left open so baby sloths can roam until they reach full independence.

Trull explains: “The goal is that they eventually spend more and more time outside the cage and more and more time eating wild foods until they are 100% wild.”

A tiny sloth in a coffee cup!

Trull admitted: “I co-founded The Sloth Institute because I wanted to spend all of my energy and time getting my hand-raised babies back into the jungle.”

The first goal of the institute is to research captive and wild sloths.

The second is to collaborate with other institutes that work with sloths from around the Globe.

The third is to educate people about sloths.

Sloths need a forest to survive, with the adequate trees, in the right number. Also, the forest needs to be healthy and connected.

People endanger sloths even more, and when they visit the area, their cars, stray dogs, and power lines additionally harm sloths 

“All these things affect every wildlife species, but especially sloths, that do not have the ability to jump away from danger or run quickly across the road.”

The worst thing is that sloths are torn from their habitat and taken to be shown in public as an attraction, for tourists to pet. This makes them anxious and can even kill them. 

If you ever visit a country with these adorable animals, be a responsible tourist and never pay to pet or hold sloths, or take a picture with one of them 

“How can I not be drawn to species that just want to eat their leaves, relax in the sunshine and the breeze and have a good scratch?!” 

“In addition, they have a very curious and playful side, something most people have never and will never see.”

Sources:
thewildchild.co.za
www.boredpanda.com
themindcircle.com
designyoutrust.com